Posts Tagged ‘interdisciplinary’

Catching up… Pics of Erin Josephson-Laidlaw: Garden

SEND + RECEIVE v15 • DAY 3 • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11

TONY CONRAD (US)
SONS OF GOD (SW)
GREENHOUSE (MB)
EVP Project (MB / QC)

Atomic Centre, 167 Logan Ave. | Doors 7:30 | Concert 8:00 | Entry: $15

 

Winnipeg musician Curran Faris has been recording and performing as Greenhouse since 2009. With albums released on labels such as Reverb Worship and Prairie Fire Tapes, Faris has performed in galleries and rock venues alike. Greenhouse sees Faris exploring atypical guitar sounds that are more akin to the austere textures found in noise and electronic music, while still utilizing the guitar as the primary sound source. The results are sprawling, textural soundscapes that are minimal and immersive, atmospheric and melodic, noisy and soothing.

Swedish artists Leif Elggren and Kent Tankred have worked in the arts for over 20 years. In 1988 they formed the duo The Sons of God (Guds Söner), a constellation which moves freely between performance, music, and the visual arts, and whose productions often reach a point where traditional aesthetic boundaries, limitations, and concepts are eliminated. The Sons of God observe and document, experiment and ask questions, build up and tear down, empowering the viewer to take what they want or simply leave. The Sons of God are radical in their approach, and their work brings something truly innovative and special to this edition of the festival.

A pioneering force behind the evolution of American minimalism, legendary artist Tony Conrad works within the idea of Eternal Music, a droning, mesmerizing performance idiom which employs long durations, amplification, and precise pitch to explore new worlds of sound. On this very special occasion Conrad will conclude our Friday night event by presenting one of his renowned solo performances for amplified violin. With a history of radical and conceptual contributions to music, film, and visual art, it’s a great honour to present Tony Conrad here at our 15th edition.

VOICES FROM BEYOND: THE EVP PROJECT

Susurros, la difunta Deolinda (Murmures, la défunte Deolinda / Whispers, the Deceased Deolinda)

MALENA SZLAM (QC)

*still from Susurros, la difunta Deolinda by Malena Szlam (16mm film-loop with sound, 2013).

This haunting work will be installed in the centre space at Atomic on this evenings’ program as part of Voices from Beyond: the EVP Project.

“Provocative, politically minded artwork challenges consumer culture and art’s place within it” By: Steven Leyden Cochrane

News and entertainment companies, advertisers and politicians regularly engage in choreographed diversion, guiding our attention in some directions rather than others, satisfying certain desires and manufacturing new ones at the expense of other, unaddressed needs.

A Total Spectacle, currently at Atomic Centre, aims to demystify and disrupt the network of influence and misdirection underpinning some of our most cherished diversions — contemporary art included.

Spectacle is both an exhibition and a piercing satire of exhibitions. Curator Milena Placentile transforms the south Point Douglas alternative space into a pitch-perfect caricature of “blockbuster” museum offerings (complete with ensuite gift shop), highlighting the work of six artists whose works reflect diverse approaches to issues of consumer culture. These range from incisive critique to nihilistic rabble-rousing to paranoid hand-waving and back again. While their effectiveness varies, each demonstrates a refreshing willingness to confront issues (and audiences) head-on.

Governor General’s Award-winner and punk-esthetic pioneer Istvan Kantor conducted the exhibition’s clamorous “opening ceremony,” which incorporated nudity, fake blood, real blood, religious iconography, sneering picket signs, open flames, and the undignified demise of a steel filing cabinet. While “smashing stuff” might be an understandable response to an intractable situation, the performance also illustrated a vulnerability of work reliant on shock: once that shock wears off, once-subversive acts eventually just look silly.

Colombian artist Praba Pilar lampooned the “cult of technology” in a low-budget, largely unscripted “service” of her “Church of Nano Info Bio Cogno” in Atomic’s unfinished attic space last week. With the “congregation” directed to engage with Pilar via smartphone and receive anointments of Coca-Cola, the performance offered a coherent, intermittently funny critique of technologically mediated interaction. (Regrettably, a related work echoes an approach to reality common to climate-change deniers and the anti-vaccine crowd, conflating very real issues like sweatshop labour with much more dubious others like the purported health hazards of wireless Internet.)

Joe Johnson’s documentary photographs of American mega-churches engage in a subtler and ultimately more provocative interrogation of organized religion’s flair for spectacle. Desk, Fort Wayne (IN) gives us a view from a cavernous church auditorium’s AV control booth, which pointedly wouldn’t look out of place in a cable-news studio or military command centre.

Similarly concerned with “optics,” Scott Srli overlays precise architectural diagrams with photographs of police “kettling” (the confinement of demonstrators and passers-by behind chains of riot police, often for hours), illustrating how carefully orchestrated scenes of “order” can seduce us into compliance with and support for the repression of dissent.

Scott Sørli’s Queen and Spadina

A number of works fittingly poach visual tropes from advertising, as in Glen Johnson’s trio of fictitious Tim Hortons television spots that skewer the conflation of national and cultural identity with corporate branding. In a pair of monumental photographs, Dayna Danger replaces the nude, oiled, and faceless fashion models of Tom Ford’s infamous 2007 magazine campaign with her own body, wedging bottles of dish detergent between her bare breasts and thighs in place of Ford’s expensive men’s cologne.

Drawing on her background in museum studies, Placentile unites the disparate works with careful staging, supplemental displays and signage, loops of odd and asinine TV footage, the aforementioned gift shop, and an “audio tour,” which is actually just a cassette of dancehall artist Sean Paul’s insipid theme song for last year’s UEFA European Championship. While highlighting artistic challenges to consumer culture, A Total Spectacle never loses sight of art’s frequent collusion with it (the not-unforeseeable parallels with the WAG’s much-ballyhooed 100 Masters are numerous and overwhelming). It’s an un-self-satisfied and all-too-uncommon approach to political art.

(But please, lose the tinfoil hat — your modem really isn’t trying to kill you.)

 

Steven Leyden Cochrane is a Winnipeg-based artist, writer and educator.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition May 30, 2013 C7. Find the online version here: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/entertainment/arts/and-now-a-word-from-209470421.html

Church of Nano Bio Info Cogno…

A Total Spectacle runs until June 9 – Admission is free!

Celebrity gawking, fear mongering, and other distractions, oh my! Is spectacle a harmless escape from reality, or something more?

 

 

Rulers throughout history have gone to great lengths to communicate and maintain their status. Whether that ruler was a dictator, royalty, religious figure, or democratically elected government, displays of power to validate and reinforce control over the masses declared who to admire, what to believe, and how to behave. Preying on core instincts to create situations that appeared effortlessly natural and self-evident, these displays of power featured elements capable of seducing people into agreement, distracting them from unpleasant truths, and/or scaring them out of rebellion.

Today’s spectacle takes many forms, from big budget events and entertainment to ever-present news media and advertising. It displays lifestyles we should envy and tells us how to succeed. It keeps us busy with news about celebrities and sports scores so we dismiss as boring anything that actually affects our lives. It sensationalizes violence while showing us what might happen if we rock the boat. It is power represented through repetitive sights and sounds, stereotypes and cliches, and other social signals about wealth, fame, and technology, and it all serves to influence general opinion and behaviour to support a consumer society and those who profit from it the most.

 

 

Taking cues from blockbuster exhibitions past and present to explore the complex nature of contemporary spectacle, A Total Spectacle is a mini spectacle about spectacle created by Winnipeg-based independent curator, Milena Placentile, in collaboration with local, national, and international artists including: Dayna Danger, Glen Johnson, Joe Johnson, Istvan Kantor, Praba Pilar, Scott Sørli, and Paul Wiersbinski.  The exhibition will be accompanied by texts written by Placentile and Martin Zeilinger.

******************

The exhibition launched at Atomic Centre (167 Logan Avenue, Winnipeg) on May 17  with an opening ceremony performed by Istvan Kantor with the participation of Ian Mozden and Dita Vendetta.


Istvan Kantor’s Pietà – Opera Omnia (2013). Video still.

 

Regular open hours from May 18 – June 9 are as follows:

  • Wednesday to Friday: 3:00 – 7:00 p.m.
  • Saturday and Sunday: 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
  • Monday and Tuesday: Closed


There are two more events scheduled to take place in relation to the exhibition:

 

Admission to the exhibition and all related events is free of charge. Please stay tuned for details!

 

******************

 

This exhibition has been made possible with thanks to generous financial support from the Canada Council for the Arts through a program formerly known as “Independent Critics and Curators in the Visual Arts Program”, which provided opportunities for creative intellectual research and production initiated by curators working beyond conventional institutional frameworks.

The curator and artists would also like to acknowledge the generous in-kind and promotional support of Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art, Martha Street Studios / Manitoba Printmakers Association, Central Canadian Centre for Performance, RAW: Gallery of Architecture and Design, Edge Village and Gallery, and Akimbo.ca =-)

Graphic design by Colourblind Graphic Design.

Church of Nano Bio Info Cogno with Reverend Praba Pilar

A Total Spectacle, in partnership with Central Canadian Centre for Performance, is pleased to host a Church of Nano Bio Info Cogno service presided over by Her Holiness, Revered Praba Pilar

May 25, 2013
Doors at 8:00 p.m. / Service begins at 8:30 p.m.
No late entry / Free admisson

Atomic Centre (167 Logan Avenue)

Rulers throughout history have gone to great lengths to communicate and maintain their status. Whether that ruler was a dictator, royalty, religious figure, or democratically elected government, displays of power to validate and reinforce control over the masses declared who to admire, what to believe, and how to behave. Preying on core instincts to create situations that appeared effortlessly natural and self-evident, these displays of power featured elements capable of seducing people into agreement, distracting them from unpleasant truths, and/or scaring them out of rebellion.

Reverend Praba Pilar, of the Church of Nano Bio Info Cogno, proclaims a liturgy that drives the divine technologies – Nanotechnology, Biotechnology, Information Technology and Cognitive Neuroscience – further forward into the neoteric millennium. Beware of the Nanarchist during the Velocity! Sinners, prepare for the Singularity by surrendering your Cognitive Memory Banks to Silicon Chips, so that you too can live forever in the realm of cybersex. When it’s all over down here, we will have left the meatware behind and taken up the post-human existence we have dreamt of. We will look back on the time when science, logic and reason – truths divinely inspired by postulates that can be proven – took us beyond the Apocalypse. With ministries around the world, this au courant Church will speed the shock waves of the future.

Biography: Praba Pilar is a Colombian-born/Winnipeg-based performance artist, technologist, and cultural theorist exploring aspects of emerging technologies which generate new forms of economic, environmental and sexual exploitation and erasure. Deeply rooted in Latino communities, she has spent the last decade presenting site works performances, street theatre, writing and websites which provide a counter-narrative to the overarching rhetoric about the beneficence of biotechnology, information technology, and nanotechnology. Pilar has performed and participated in panel presentations at galleries and universities worldwide. She is currently in a doctoral program at UC Davis in Performance Studies, with designated emphases in Practice as Research and in Feminist Theory and Research, and is the recent recipient of the UC Davis President’s Pre-Doctoral Award (2007-2011), a Puffin Foundation Grant (2004), the Creative Capital Foundation Award (2002), and the Zellerbach Family Fund Award (2002), among numerous other honours. In January 2013, Pilar began a Post Doctorate at the University of Winnipeg with the Institute of Women’s and Gender Studies. http://www.prabapilar.com.

* * *

This service is presented at Atomic Centre in relation to A Total Spectacle, a mini spectacle about spectacle organized by Winnipeg-based independent curator, Milena Placentile, in collaboration with local, national, and international artists. A Total Spectacle runs from May 18 – June 9 at Atomic Centre (167 Logan Avenue, Winnipeg) with a grand opening on May 17 beginning at 7:00 p.m. Admission to the exhibition and all related events, including this service, is free of charge. For more information, please visit: http://www.atomiccentre.net.

A Total Spectacle has been made possible with thanks to generous financial support from the Canada Council for the Arts through a program formerly known as “Independent Critics and Curators in the Visual Arts Program”, which provided opportunities for creative and intellectual research and production initiated by curators working beyond conventional institutional frameworks. The curator and artists would also like to acknowledge the generous in-kind and promotional support of Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art, Martha Street Studios / Manitoba Printmakers Association, Central Canadian Centre for Performance, Edge Gallery and Akimbo.ca

Face-Off: Latina Artists in the Techno Sphere

A Total Spectacle is thrilled to partner with Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art in the presentation of  “Face-Off:  Latina Artists in the Techno Sphere” with Praba Pilar.

Praba Pilar, BOT I, performance still, 2010. Photo by Cisco

The sphere of technology is expanding exponentially into public and private space, raising complex questions.  In this talk, Pilar examines the spectrum of performance art works of Latina artists who critically engage unethical aspects of advanced techno-culture, from workers in computer manufacturing maquiladoras to the genetically modified corn fields of Mexico.

Colombian multi-disciplinary artist Praba Pilar traverses the intersections of art and technology with satire and analysis. Best known for work merging French theorist Paul Virilio with Mexican comedian Cantinflas, her performance work has travelled internationally to museums, galleries, universities, public spaces and online channels, and has been honoured with multiple awards.

Join us!

Friday, May 3, 2013
12:00 – 1:00 p.m. at MAWA (611 Main Street)
Free for all!

A Total Spectacle… coming soon!

Celebrity gawking, fear mongering, and other distractions, oh my! Is spectacle a harmless escape from reality, or something more?



Rulers throughout history have gone to great lengths to communicate and maintain their status. Whether that ruler was a dictator, royalty, religious figure, or democratically elected government, displays of power to validate and reinforce control over the masses declared who to admire, what to believe, and how to behave. Preying on core instincts to create situations that appeared effortlessly natural and self-evident, these displays of power featured elements capable of seducing people into agreement, distracting them from unpleasant truths, and/or scaring them out of rebellion.

Today’s spectacle takes many forms, from big budget events and entertainment to ever-present news media and advertising. It displays lifestyles we should envy and tells us how to succeed. It keeps us busy with news about celebrities and sports scores so we dismiss as boring anything that actually affects our lives. It sensationalizes violence while showing us what might happen if we rock the boat. It is power represented through repetitive sights and sounds, stereotypes and cliches, and other social signals about wealth, fame, and technology, and it all serves to influence general opinion and behaviour to support a consumer society and those who profit from it the most.

******************

Taking cues from blockbuster exhibitions past and present to explore the complex nature of contemporary spectacle, A Total Spectacle is a mini spectacle about spectacle created by Winnipeg-based independent curator, Milena Placentile, in collaboration with local, national, and international artists including: Dayna Danger, Glen Johnson, Joe Johnson, Istvan Kantor, Praba Pilar, Scott Sørli, and Paul Wiersbinski.

******************

The exhibition launches at Atomic Centre (167 Logan Avenue, Winnipeg) on May 17 from 7:00 – 10:00 p.m., with an opening ceremony beginning promptly at 8:00 p.m.

Regular open hours from May 18 – June 9 are as follows:

  • Wednesday to Friday: 3:00 – 7:00 p.m.
  • Saturday and Sunday: 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
  • Monday and Tuesday: Closed

The following events will take place in relation to the exhibition:

  • Artist talk with Praba Pilar at Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art (611 Main Street): Friday, May 3, 2013 at 12:00 p.m.
  • Exhibition launch: Friday, May 17 from 7:00 – 10:00 p.m. with opening ceremony perfomed by Istvan Kantor beginning promptly at 8:00 p.m. >>> After party: Central Canadian Centre for Performance’s “Pin It to Win It” at Ozzy’s. Details forthcoming!
  • Artist talk with Scott Sørli at RAW: Gallery of Architecture & Design (290 McDermot Avenue): Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 6:00 p.m.
  • Church of the Nano Bio Info Cogno at 167 Logan Avenue: Saturday, May 25, 2103. Doors at 8:00 p.m. ; service at 8:30 p.m. No late entry.
  • First lecture in the new series “How to Think” delivered by Glen Johnson at 167 Logan Avenue: Saturday, June 1, 2013 at 4:00 p.m.

Admission to the exhibition and all related events is free of charge. Please stay tuned for details!

******************

This exhibition has been made possible with thanks to generous financial support from the Canada Council for the Arts through a program formerly known as “Independent Critics and Curators in the Visual Arts Program”, which provided opportunities for creative intellectual research and production initiated by curators working beyond conventional institutional frameworks.

The curator and artists would also like to acknowledge the generous in-kind and promotional support of Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art, Martha Street Studios / Manitoba Printmakers Association, Central Canadian Centre for Performance, RAW: Gallery of Architecture and Design, Edge Village and Gallery, and Akimbo.ca =-)

Graphic design by Colourblind Graphic Design.

******************

Background, for those who like details

“La dottrina del fascismo” (“The Doctrine of Fascism”), written by Giovanni Gentile in 1932 and attributed to Benito Mussolini in 1933, describes fascism as the harmonization of business and labour in the interest of the State. Appreciating Mussolini’s commitment to reduced taxation and union busting, wealthy business owners granted him their support before realizing he aimed to personally control Italy’s various industries by means of a dictatorship. As the self-declared undisputed head of state, Mussolini detested bourgeois luxury and ultimately dismissed the authority of business owners as subordinate to his own. Business owners in Germany experienced similar difficulty controlling Adolph Hitler, the dictator they funded as a way to control striking workers by proxy.

Through the course of events associated with World War II, Mussolini’s Fascism and Hitler’s Nazism were dismantled. Around this time, wealthy business owners and other members of the global elite figured something out: why buy social control via individual, charismatic leaders when you can buy the whole system instead? Representing what became known as the Austrian school of Economics, Friedrich Hayek and Ludwig von Mises co-organized a meeting in 1947 at Hôtel du Parc, near Vevey, Switzerland, that established a European economic federation called The Mont Pelerin Society. Designed to promote aggressive liberal/anti-socialist ideology through a decentralized network, the Society facilitated the development and funding of think tanks, policy makers, and lobby groups, as well as the grooming of politicians and backing of favourable candidates. Simultaneously, through concentrated ownership of the media producing an increasingly narrow spectrum of discourse, corporatist ideologues have compelled large segments of society into willingly surrender many of the human and environmental rights gained since the end of World War II.

Seduce ‘em with consumer goods. Distract ‘em with vapid entertainment. Control ‘em with fear. That is how to harmonize the workers and the state in the interests of business.

******************

What are your plans for after the launch of A Total Spectacle? We’ll be going to Pin It to Win It, an amazing one of a kind burlesting event hosted by our friends Central Canadian Centre for Performance. Find all the details right here: https://www.facebook.com/events/646939255332785/?ref=ts&fref=ts. And, don’t forget, coming to A Total Spectacle and obtaining a stamp at the door with get you into the Pin It to Win It for only $10!! How can anyone say no to that? ;-)

“Graphic novel evolves into stage journey of grief” by Kevin Prokosh, Winnipeg Free Press

New York City director Kathleen Amshoff knew little about Winnipeg when she accepted an invitation to come here to create the latest version of a graphic novel for the stage.

Swell is an art comic by American artist Juliacks that has been dramatized by groups of artists around the world before its full-length première last March at Culture Project’s Women Center Stage Festival in Manhattan.

Winnipeg doesn’t typically follow New York City on the avant-garde art-making circuit.

“I think I heard the name when I was in grad school in Pittsburgh,” says Amshoff, who is helming Swell at the Atomic Centre this weekend. “I always had the idea that Winnipeg and Pittsburgh were related cities with a post-industrial legacy and perogies.

“Then I started reading about the work Guy Maddin is doing here. I watched a little bit of My Winnipeg. In my mind, it seems like a centre of experimentation.”

Swell has been developed south of the border, as well as in Australia and Scandinavia. It was in Sweden last year when local curator and writer Milena Placentile met Juliacks and offered to host Swell 2.0 in Winnipeg at the Atomic Centre, a huge multidisciplinary art space at Logan Avenue and Martha Street.

“We plan to keep touring the project both in the States and nationally, in each place collaborating with local artists,” says the Houston-born Amshoff. “It’s a lot more interesting, though a lot more work, than simply dropping down in a city and doing a show.”

SUPPLIED PHOTO Charlene Van Buekenhout (left) and Tanja Woloshen ride a bike in Swell.

The 20-something Juliacks (Julia Stein), who is also coming to Winnipeg, uses the world of comics to explore challenging topics such as death, grief and memory. Swell, the final work of a series called The Tome of Hallow County, is the story of Emmeline, who unexpectedly loses her sister after a strained time in their relationship and goes on a strange, idiosyncratic journey of grief.

In a New York Times review, the actress playing Emmeline was lauded for carrying “you through the story’s emotional netherworld, and you emerge grateful for having made Emmeline’s acquaintance.”

In Winnipeg, with cast members Tanja Woloshen, Coral Maloney, Brenda McLean, Chris Sabel and Charlene Van Buekenhout, Swell is being re-imagined by local designer Barb Choboter with live manipulation of projected images from the book. As with the graphic novel, the dominant colour scheme is back and white.

Since 2008, Swell has been a recurring part of Amshoff’s artistic life. She, like Juliacks, is one of three sisters and could immediately empathize with Emmeline.

“The story and imagery in Swell are one of a kind,” says Amshoff, who, also like Juliacks, is a Fulbright scholar. “I love Juliacks’ drawings: they are primitive, intricate, kaleidoscopic. They capture something about the experience of loss.”

Following the Friday and Saturday evening performances, bereavement consultants and educators will conduct a post-show conversation. Performance artist Lasha Mowchun will be handing out free maps to the afterlife in the lobby.

kevin.prokosh@freepress.mb.ca

Theatre preview

Swell

Atomic Centre, 167 Logan Ave.

Runs tonight and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m.

Tickets: $10, reserve at 204-944-1621

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition November 9, 2012 D3

Reserve your tickets now… SWELL (November 9, 10, 11)

Emmeline Grouse lives in a small town in Vermont, in a house overlooking an abandoned cemetery where she and her sister Lucy would often play. Adapted from the comic art novel by US-born/Lyon-based artist Juliacks, SWELL explores the memory-shifting and kaleidoscopic journey of grief as Emmeline confronts her fears, dreams and imagination.

SWELL premièred in March 2012 at Culture Project’s Women Center Stage Festival in Manhattan and was met with rave reviews in the New York Times and Huffington Post. Travelling now to Winnipeg, where it will be re-imagined in partnership with a variety of local contributors, SWELL is ready to rise again combining the graphic novel’s narrative with sound, video, and performance art, resulting in a spectacular, character-driven reflection of loss.

Directed by Kathleen Amshoff (New York) and associate directed/dramaturged by Sam Creely (New York), SWELL will be performed by Tanja Faylene, Coral Maloney, Brenda McLean, Chris Sabel, Charlene Van Buekenhout with additional contributions from Lasha Mowchun and Barbara Choboter. Possibly more TBA!

SWELL is a uniquely beautiful work that has transformed across a range of artistic media since its original inception in 2006. Changing with each group of collaborators, SWELL is an ongoing project that anticipates travelling to other cities so that it may continue to evolve over time.

Photo by Hunter Canning of the NY production featuring Katey Parker, Emma Galvin and Dan Vidor

For additional information about the history of SWELL, including notes about its past development in the United States, Australia and various locations throughout Scandinavia, please visit: http://www.swellshow.org/history.html.

Showtimes:
—–Friday, November 9: Doors at 7:30 p.m.; Showtime at 8:00 p.m.
—–Saturday, November 10: Doors at 7:30 p.m.; Showtime at 8:00 p.m.
—–Sunday, November 11: Doors at 1:30 p.m.; Showtime at 2:00 p.m.

Admission: Reserve seating will be made available beginning October 28. To reserve seats, please email info@atomiccentre.net or call 204.944.1621. Admission is $10.00 payable at the door (cash only). Thank you!

Location: Atomic (167 Logan Avenue – the only building at the corner of Martha Street and Logan Avenue). The venue is easily accessible by a number of bus routes. Limited street parking available; additional parking is available at the Impark lot adjacent to the Manitoba Museum of Man and Nature.

Additional links:

 

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