Posts Tagged ‘get involved’

Whose Winnipeg? – August 20, 2013 – 765 Main Street

Whose Winnipeg?
A Workshop about Neoliberalism, Settler Colonialism, and the Production of Urban Space

This workshop brings together activists, advocates, writers, researchers, journalists, artists, and organizers to present notes, observations, histories, research findings, arguments, questions, essays, and articles about the contemporary urban processes that shape Winnipeg, from an anti-colonial and anti-neoliberal perspective.

It is a continuation of discussions that took place at two consecutive workshops organized by Owen Toews, David Hugill, and Bronwyn Dobchuk-Land at the 2013 meeting of the Association of American Geographers (AAG) in Los Angeles, California, USA.

The Winnipeg incarnation of this workshop has been organized by Kate Sjoberg, Owen Toews, and Bronwyn Dobchuk-Land and is generously sponsored by the Manitoba Research Alliance.

WHEN?

Tuesday, August 20, 2013 from 4:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Full schedule and session descriptions available here.

WHERE?

The Social Enterprise Center
765 Main Street, Winnipeg, MB

 

Please RSVP!

If you are not presenting and would like to attend the workshop as a listener, please confirm your attendance by August 15, 2013. Your RSVP will allow us to make sure there are enough chairs and enough food!

RSVP by sending an email to: whosewinnipeg@gmail.com

Please indicate whether or not you will be in need of childcare.

Philosophy Class for Children to resume in October… Would you like to be involved?

No toys or gadgets, rather bodies, collective philosophical explorations, oral story telling, and noise. A child-led debriefing of the 9-5 formal constraint. Free food.

Adults interested in radical pedagogy, deschooling and other related topics are now welcome to participate!

Would you like to be involved in pre-planning for sessions starting up again on Sunday, October 13? Please contact jenn angela lopes and tara mooney at languagelikefigskins@gmail.com and taramooney@mail.com for more information =-)

 

Erin Josephson-Laidlaw: Garden

 

GARDEN

an exhibition of artwork by

ERIN JOSEPHSON-LAIDLAW

Opening: July 25 from 7 – 10 p.m.

Gallery hours: July 26 -  August 1 from 3 -  6 p.m. (or by appointment)

Atomic Centre: 167 Logan Avenue, Winnipeg

erinjosephsonlaidlaw.com

A Total Spectacle runs until June 9 – Admission is free!

Celebrity gawking, fear mongering, and other distractions, oh my! Is spectacle a harmless escape from reality, or something more?

 

 

Rulers throughout history have gone to great lengths to communicate and maintain their status. Whether that ruler was a dictator, royalty, religious figure, or democratically elected government, displays of power to validate and reinforce control over the masses declared who to admire, what to believe, and how to behave. Preying on core instincts to create situations that appeared effortlessly natural and self-evident, these displays of power featured elements capable of seducing people into agreement, distracting them from unpleasant truths, and/or scaring them out of rebellion.

Today’s spectacle takes many forms, from big budget events and entertainment to ever-present news media and advertising. It displays lifestyles we should envy and tells us how to succeed. It keeps us busy with news about celebrities and sports scores so we dismiss as boring anything that actually affects our lives. It sensationalizes violence while showing us what might happen if we rock the boat. It is power represented through repetitive sights and sounds, stereotypes and cliches, and other social signals about wealth, fame, and technology, and it all serves to influence general opinion and behaviour to support a consumer society and those who profit from it the most.

 

 

Taking cues from blockbuster exhibitions past and present to explore the complex nature of contemporary spectacle, A Total Spectacle is a mini spectacle about spectacle created by Winnipeg-based independent curator, Milena Placentile, in collaboration with local, national, and international artists including: Dayna Danger, Glen Johnson, Joe Johnson, Istvan Kantor, Praba Pilar, Scott Sørli, and Paul Wiersbinski.  The exhibition will be accompanied by texts written by Placentile and Martin Zeilinger.

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The exhibition launched at Atomic Centre (167 Logan Avenue, Winnipeg) on May 17  with an opening ceremony performed by Istvan Kantor with the participation of Ian Mozden and Dita Vendetta.


Istvan Kantor’s Pietà – Opera Omnia (2013). Video still.

 

Regular open hours from May 18 – June 9 are as follows:

  • Wednesday to Friday: 3:00 – 7:00 p.m.
  • Saturday and Sunday: 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
  • Monday and Tuesday: Closed


There are two more events scheduled to take place in relation to the exhibition:

 

Admission to the exhibition and all related events is free of charge. Please stay tuned for details!

 

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This exhibition has been made possible with thanks to generous financial support from the Canada Council for the Arts through a program formerly known as “Independent Critics and Curators in the Visual Arts Program”, which provided opportunities for creative intellectual research and production initiated by curators working beyond conventional institutional frameworks.

The curator and artists would also like to acknowledge the generous in-kind and promotional support of Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art, Martha Street Studios / Manitoba Printmakers Association, Central Canadian Centre for Performance, RAW: Gallery of Architecture and Design, Edge Village and Gallery, and Akimbo.ca =-)

Graphic design by Colourblind Graphic Design.

“How to Think… About Spectacle” with Glen Johnson

A Total Spectacle, in partnership with Central Canadian Centre for Performance, is pleased to present “About Spectacle”, the first lecture in a new series by Glen Johnson titled, “How to Think”.

 

Saturday, June 1, 2013 – 4:00 p.m.
Atomic Centre (167 Logan Avenue)
Admission is Free

.
Rulers throughout history have gone to great lengths to communicate and maintain their status. Whether that ruler was a dictator, royalty, religious figure, or democratically elected government, displays of power to validate and reinforce control over the masses declared who to admire, what to believe, and how to behave. Preying on core instincts to create situations that appeared effortlessly natural and self-evident, these displays of power featured elements capable of seducing people into agreement, distracting them from unpleasant truths, and/or scaring them out of rebellion.

While going about his daily business, which involved a good deal of riding on public transit, Glen Johnson noticed that a great number of his fellow citizens seemed to be having trouble using their brains. He thought it behooved him to do something to try and rectify this situation. Now, as a kind of public service, Mr. Johnson has begun a series of lectures which he has entitled How to Think. The first lecture of this series: How to Think About Spectacle will be performed on June 1st at the Atomic Centre. You owe it to yourself to attend.

Biography: Glen Johnson is a Winnipeg-based writer, installation and performance artist whose work invariably involves text (especially when he is writing). Johnson tells stories as “Uncle Glennie” and as himself, he has delivered faux-lectures to stunned audiences in at least three provinces. He has hung a bed on one wall and nailed tiny words to another. In 2011 he created the Artistic Licence Bureau for the Platform Centre for Photographic and Digital Arts. He has exhibited and/or performed at aceartinc, The Annex, Atomic Centre, Gallery 803, Gallery 1C03, Mount Saint Vincent University, The National Gallery of Canada, The Tallest Poppy, Videopool Media Arts Centre and the Winnipeg Art Gallery. He is responsible for the website http://www.persiflage.ca. He received a Bachelor’s Degree in Classics from The University of Winnipeg in 1993 and expects that some day they will ask for it back.

This lecture is presented at Atomic Centre in relation to A Total Spectacle, a mini spectacle about spectacle organized by Winnipeg-based independent curator, Milena Placentile, in collaboration with local, national, and international artists. A Total Spectacle runs from May 18 – June 9 at Atomic Centre. Admission to the exhibition and all related events, including this lecture, is free of charge. For more information, please visit: http://www.atomiccentre.net.

A Total Spectacle has been made possible with thanks to generous financial support from the Canada Council for the Arts through a program formerly known as “Independent Critics and Curators in the Visual Arts Program”, which provided opportunities for creative and intellectual research and production initiated by curators working beyond conventional institutional frameworks. The curator and artists would also like to acknowledge the generous in-kind and promotional support of Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art, Martha Street Studios / Manitoba Printmakers Association, Central Canadian Centre for Performance, Edge Gallery and Akimbo.ca

Face-Off: Latina Artists in the Techno Sphere

A Total Spectacle is thrilled to partner with Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art in the presentation of  “Face-Off:  Latina Artists in the Techno Sphere” with Praba Pilar.

Praba Pilar, BOT I, performance still, 2010. Photo by Cisco

The sphere of technology is expanding exponentially into public and private space, raising complex questions.  In this talk, Pilar examines the spectrum of performance art works of Latina artists who critically engage unethical aspects of advanced techno-culture, from workers in computer manufacturing maquiladoras to the genetically modified corn fields of Mexico.

Colombian multi-disciplinary artist Praba Pilar traverses the intersections of art and technology with satire and analysis. Best known for work merging French theorist Paul Virilio with Mexican comedian Cantinflas, her performance work has travelled internationally to museums, galleries, universities, public spaces and online channels, and has been honoured with multiple awards.

Join us!

Friday, May 3, 2013
12:00 – 1:00 p.m. at MAWA (611 Main Street)
Free for all!

On the political aesthetics of police kettling

A Total Spectacle, in partnership with RAW: Gallery of Architecture and Design, welcomes Toronto-based architect and artist, Scott Sørli to give a talk on the political aesthetics of police kettling on May 18, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. (290 McDermot Avenue).

Rulers throughout history have gone to great lengths to communicate and maintain their status. Whether that ruler was a dictator, royalty, religious figure, or democratically elected government, displays of power to validate and reinforce control over the masses declared who to admire, what to believe, and how to behave. Preying on core instincts to create situations that appeared effortlessly natural and self-evident, these displays of power featured elements capable of seducing people into agreement, distracting them from unpleasant truths, and/or scaring them out of rebellion.

 

Almost 300 Montreal protestors (and one Anarchopanda) kettled by 24 police, March 22, 2013. Photo: Tim McSorley for Media Co-op.


A police kettle can be described as the activation of a police cordon into an encirclement. A wall (composed of: the bodies and minds of police; mobile inorganic material such as shields, truncheons, and Kevlar; and adjacent fixed urban infrastructures) constitutes the architectural enclosure of a police kettle. In contrast to a police cordon, which is designed to keep people out, a police kettle is designed to keep people in. Three formal characteristics of a police kettle are its relatively small size (up to a maximum of a thousand people contained, usually less than half that); its relatively long duration (a minimum of three hours, and up to thirteen and possibly even more); and its constant impermeability.

The phrase ‘police kettle’ comes from the German polizeikessel, which translates literally as ‘police cauldron’ (polizeikette, a closer homonym, translates as ‘police cordon’). The spatial and linguistic source descends from the specific military use of the term ‘encirclement’, which comes from kesselschlacht (literally, ‘cauldron battle’). The metaphor of an impermeable container whose contents are heated up over time by an external source is the precise analogy of a police kettle.

Fauna is introduced in spurts of attack dogs and police horses, while the durational component of kettling gives rise to atmospherics. The sun sets and it gets dark; temperatures fall and people get cold; it frequently rains and they get wet. Phenomenological tools are deployed by the police as well: tear gas and pepper spray are released; high volume sound is transmitted through bullhorns; hunger is created by the withholding of food; washroom breaks are not permitted; tactile sensations are delivered with truncheons. Other means of aesthetic transmission include: the design of police uniforms; the choice of black as the primary colour scheme; occasional back-lighting to increase drama, and so on.

These and other technologies are means of generation of affect. Over the time of the kettle, emotional states produced include confusion, anxiety, fear, and despair. As austerity unfolds, politics are rendered aesthetic.

Artist biography: In addition to holding a recent post-graduate level degree in design research from the University of Michigan, Scott Sørli has received professional degrees in engineering from the University of Waterloo (majoring in process control) and in architecture from the University of Toronto. His graduating thesis in architecture, Open Systems, was awarded the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Medal. After working for a small residential architecture firm, Sørli initiated a design-research practice that operates across scales and among disciplines. He is also co-curator of convenience, a window gallery that provides an opening for art that engages, experiments, and takes risks with the architectural, urban, and civic realm. Current research explores potential agencies of wilding as bubbles of liberation fracking institutional stratifications. To read more about Sørli’s research on police kettling, please visit: http://www.scapegoatjournal.org/docs/03/03_Sorli_ShortHistoryOfKettling.pdf. For more information about convenience, please visit: http://conveniencegallery.com

This talk presented at RAW: Gallery of Architecture & Design relates to A Total Spectacle, a mini spectacle about spectacle organized by Winnipeg-based independent curator, Milena Placentile, in collaboration with local, national, and international artists: Dayna Danger, Glen Johnson, Joe Johnson, Istvan Kantor, Praba Pilar, Scott Sørli, and Paul Wiersbinski. A Total Spectacle runs from May 18 – June 9 at Atomic Centre (167 Logan Avenue, Winnipeg) with a grand opening on May 17 beginning at 7:00 p.m. Admission to the exhibition and all related events, including this artist talk, is free of charge. For more information, please visit: http://www.atomiccentre.net.

A Total Spectacle has been made possible with thanks to generous financial support from the Canada Council for the Arts through a program formerly known as “Independent Critics and Curators in the Visual Arts Program”, which provided opportunities for creative and intellectual research and production initiated by curators working beyond conventional institutional frameworks. The curator and artists would also like to acknowledge the generous in-kind and promotional support of Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art, Martha Street Studios / Manitoba Printmakers Association, Central Canadian Centre for Performance, and Edge Gallery.

Call for artists/designers

Summary

Seeking artists/designers to create four banners that will be digitally printed in Winnipeg (Canada) for presentation as part of an exhibition titled “A Total Spectacle” opening May 17, 2013.

Background

“La dottrina del fascismo” (“The Doctrine of Fascism”), written by Giovanni Gentile in 1932 and attributed to Benito Mussolini in 1933, describes fascism as the harmonization of business and labour in the interest of the State. Appreciating Mussolini’s commitment to reduced taxation and union busting, wealthy business owners granted him their support before realizing he aimed to personally control Italy’s various industries by means of a dictatorship. As the self-declared undisputed head of state, Mussolini detested bourgeois luxury and ultimately dismissed the authority of business owners as subordinate to his own. Business owners in Germany experienced similar difficulty controlling Adolph Hitler, the dictator they funded as a way to control striking workers by proxy.

Through the course of events associated with World War II, Mussolini’s Fascism and Hitler’s Nazism were dismantled. Around this time, wealthy business owners and other members of the global elite figured something out: why buy social control via individual, charismatic leaders when you can buy the whole system instead? Representing what became known as the Austrian school of Economics, Friedrich Hayek and Ludwig von Mises co-organized a meeting in 1947 at Hôtel du Parc, near Vevey, Switzerland, that established a European economic federation called The Mont Pelerin Society. Designed to promote aggressive liberal/anti-socialist ideology through a decentralized network, the Society facilitated the development and funding of think tanks, policy makers, and lobby groups, as well as the grooming of politicians and backing of favourable candidates. Simultaneously, through concentrated ownership of the media producing an increasingly narrow spectrum of discourse, corporatist ideologues have compelled large segments of society into willingly surrender many of the human and environmental rights gained since the end of World War II. Seduce ‘em with consumer goods. Distract ‘em with vapid entertainment. Control ‘em with fear. That is how to harmonize the workers and the state in the interests of business.

 

Exhibition concept

“A Total Spectacle” will be an exhibition of interdisciplinary work by contemporary artists presented with photos, videos, and other items culled from mass culture in a format that takes cues from blockbuster exhibitions throughout history from Mussolini’s 1932 “Mostra della rivoluzione fascista” (“Exhibition of the Fascist Revolution”) to contemporary for-profit infotainment exhibitions-in-a-box type productions. Playing humourously on notions of authority, this “homemade” spectacle about spectacle will address everyday neoliberal practices intended to cultivate social control through seduction, diversion, and fear.

Since no exhibition about totalitarianism and spectacle would be complete without banners, this project seeks an artist/designer to create a series of four banners that will hang from the ceiling of the exhibition space to frame four sub-topics: power, sex, consumption, and fear.

 

Submission requirements and deadline:

Please submit low resolution concept drawings (.eps, .jpg., .pdf, or .tif) for four banners in a mock corporate style to represent each of the following four “values”: power, sex, consumption, and fear.

A design concept that references the way corporate values are presented in promotional material such as shareholder reports and/or print advertising is ideal. Any range of colours may be used, but less ink means better affordability; please create an image that makes ample use of white space, especially if you would like your completed banners mailed to you at the end of the exhibition.

Submissions should be accompanied by:

  • a brief artist statement
  • a few examples of past work (i.e. links to projects)

Please send submissions to contact@shintai-z.com by Saturday, February 23, 2013. Late submissions will not be considered. The selected artist/designer will be notified within one week, and all others will be notified shortly thereafter.

 

Specifications for selected work:

Four banners will be digitally printed at Martha Street Studios (Manitoba Printmakers Association) for presentation as part of the exhibition mentioned above. The banners will hang from the ceiling. The file specifications are as follows:

  • One banner per file to represent each of the following “values”: power, sex, consumption, fear
  • Any range of colours may be used, but less ink means better affordability; please create an image that makes ample use of white space, especially if you would like your completed banners mailed to you at the end of the exhibition
  • Finished dimensions of each banner must be: 36” (91 cm) wide x 72” (182 cm) long
  • 360 dpi preferred; 300 dpi acceptable
  • .tif or .eps preferred; .jpg acceptable
  • print-ready files must be provided by Monday, April 22, 2013

 

Compensation

The selected artist/designer will receive an exhibition fee exceeding the minimum recommendations set forth by CARFAC Canadian Artists’ Representation / Le Front des artistes canadiens for 2013 in the category applying to group shows featuring 6 -10 artists (Category I). The artist fee will be payable in Canadian dollars via electronic means for automatic currency conversion where applicable. The banners will be printed at Martha Street Studios (Manitoba Printmakers Association) in Winnipeg. Every effort will be made to ship the finished work to the artist following the exhibition, budget permitting.

 

Thank you so much! I look forward to your submissions!

With all best regards,
Milena Placentile, Curator

Philosophy Class for Children

Starting March 3, 2013 and running for four consecutive Sundays from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m., please feel welcome to participate in a philosophy class for children.

No toys or gadgets, rather bodies, collective philosophical explorations, oral story telling and noise.
Child-led debriefing of the 9-5 formal constraint.
Free food.

For more information, please contact jenn angela lopes and tara mooney at languagelikefigskins@gmail.com and taramooney@mail.com, respectively.

Four Horsemen Film Screening

Join us on Friday February 15 at 7:00 p.m. for a community screening of Four Horsemen.
Admission is free, but if you wish to make a donation to the filmmakers, it will be collected and passed on.

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Four Horsemen (2012) is an independent feature documentary by Renegade Economist that lifts the lid on how the world really works.

http://buy.fourhorsemenfilm.com/
http://www.renegadeeconomist.com/

About:

Four Horsemen is the debut feature from director Ross Ashcroft which reveals the fundamental flaws in the economic system which have brought our civilization to the brink of disaster.

23 leading thinkers –frustrated at the failure of their respective disciplines – break their silence to explain how the world really works.

The film pulls no punches in describing the consequences of continued inaction – but its message is one of hope. If more people can equip themselves with a better understanding of how the world really works, then the systems and structures that condemn billions to poverty or chronic insecurity can at last be overturned. Solutions to the multiple crises facing humanity have never been more urgent, but equally, the conditions for change have never been more favourable.

* * *

We’ll have some snacks available, but please feel free to bring your own/to share. Discussion to follow, if those present decide they wanna.

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