Archive for October, 2012

Reserve your tickets now… SWELL (November 9, 10, 11)

Emmeline Grouse lives in a small town in Vermont, in a house overlooking an abandoned cemetery where she and her sister Lucy would often play. Adapted from the comic art novel by US-born/Lyon-based artist Juliacks, SWELL explores the memory-shifting and kaleidoscopic journey of grief as Emmeline confronts her fears, dreams and imagination.

SWELL premièred in March 2012 at Culture Project’s Women Center Stage Festival in Manhattan and was met with rave reviews in the New York Times and Huffington Post. Travelling now to Winnipeg, where it will be re-imagined in partnership with a variety of local contributors, SWELL is ready to rise again combining the graphic novel’s narrative with sound, video, and performance art, resulting in a spectacular, character-driven reflection of loss.

Directed by Kathleen Amshoff (New York) and associate directed/dramaturged by Sam Creely (New York), SWELL will be performed by Tanja Faylene, Coral Maloney, Brenda McLean, Chris Sabel, Charlene Van Buekenhout with additional contributions from Lasha Mowchun and Barbara Choboter. Possibly more TBA!

SWELL is a uniquely beautiful work that has transformed across a range of artistic media since its original inception in 2006. Changing with each group of collaborators, SWELL is an ongoing project that anticipates travelling to other cities so that it may continue to evolve over time.

Photo by Hunter Canning of the NY production featuring Katey Parker, Emma Galvin and Dan Vidor

For additional information about the history of SWELL, including notes about its past development in the United States, Australia and various locations throughout Scandinavia, please visit: http://www.swellshow.org/history.html.

Showtimes:
—–Friday, November 9: Doors at 7:30 p.m.; Showtime at 8:00 p.m.
—–Saturday, November 10: Doors at 7:30 p.m.; Showtime at 8:00 p.m.
—–Sunday, November 11: Doors at 1:30 p.m.; Showtime at 2:00 p.m.

Admission: Reserve seating will be made available beginning October 28. To reserve seats, please email info@atomiccentre.net or call 204.944.1621. Admission is $10.00 payable at the door (cash only). Thank you!

Location: Atomic (167 Logan Avenue – the only building at the corner of Martha Street and Logan Avenue). The venue is easily accessible by a number of bus routes. Limited street parking available; additional parking is available at the Impark lot adjacent to the Manitoba Museum of Man and Nature.

Additional links:

 

((( send+receive ))) v.14 / day 4

The final night of the festival showcased acoustic performances making use of natural materials and phenomena, as well as familiar instruments, as extensions of the body with performances by NMPERIGN (US) and AKIO SUZUKI (JP). Christian Wolff’s Stones was performed by Chris Bauer, Al Conroy, Doreen Girard, Tom Kohut, Shelagh Pizey-Allen, Wendy Rondeau, Curtis Walker and Nathan Zahn. I regret not having photos of their collaborative performance — it both sounded and looked fantastic. Indeed, the whole night was awesome. Thanks for another amazing festival ((( send+receive )))

((( send + receive ))) v. 14 / day 3

Featuring: The Rita (van), Tomoko Sauvage (fr/jp), Angela Forget (wpg) and Drip Music (Brecht)

And there’s more to come…
Saturday, October 20, 2012…

CONCERT | 7:30 doors • 8:00 concert | $15 or $25 for Fri/Sat

STONES (CHRISTIAN WOLFF) | NMPERIGN (US) | AKIO SUZUKI (JP)
Atomic Centre, 167 Logan Ave.

The final night of the festival will showcase acoustic performances making use of natural materials and phenomena, as well as familiar instruments, as extensions of the body.

The program will begin with a performance of the composition Stones by eminent American composer Christian Wolff (b. 1934). Wolff is the last living member of the New York School of composers, which included John Cage, Morton Feldman and Earle Brown. This narrative score will be interpreted and performed by the send + receive Temporary Ensemble featuring locals; Chris Bauer, Al Conroy, Doreen Girard, Tom Kohut, Shelagh Pizey-Allen, Wendy Rondeau, Curtis Walker and Nathan Zahn.

American duo Nmperign is composed of soprano saxophone player Bhob Rainey and trumpeter Greg Kelley. This duo has been working together in experimental improvisation for over a decade, exploring terrain shaped by a wide range of influences from classical music to punk rock. Selecting woodwind and horns was of specific interest to us this year as these instruments demand a particular physical engagement with their player, a dependency on the limitations of the body, of the lungs, the breath… Both players have expanded the language of these instruments and taken the possibilities of sound to new ends, creating an exciting and surprising collaboration.

We are honoured to conclude our 14th festival with one of the pioneers of sound art, Japanese artist Akio Suzuki. The artist who motivated the overall theme of this year’s festival, Suzuki embodies an important field of sound exploration that focuses on purposeful listening and a conceptual approach to natural materials and acoustic phenomena. A charming and down to earth artist, his performance will encompass a diversity of materials and invented instruments, creating a uniquely engaging concert experience.

Artist bios here: http://www.sendandreceive.org/artist-bios.html

SWELL Comes to Winnipeg with a Local Twist November 9 – 11, 2012

Emmeline Grouse lives in a small town in Vermont, in a house overlooking an abandoned cemetery where she and her sister Lucy would often play. Adapted from the comic art novel by US-born/Lyon-based artist Juliacks, SWELL explores the memory-shifting and kaleidoscopic journey of grief as Emmeline confronts her fears, dreams and imagination.

SWELL premièred in March 2012 at Culture Project’s Women Center Stage Festival in Manhattan and was met with rave reviews in the New York Times and Huffington Post. Travelling now to Winnipeg, where it will be re-imagined in partnership with a variety of local contributors, SWELL is ready to rise again combining the graphic novel’s narrative with sound, video, and performance art, resulting in a spectacular, character-driven reflection of loss.Directed by Kathleen Amshoff (New York) and associate directed/dramaturged by Sam Creely (New York), SWELL will be performed by Coral Maloney, Brenda McLean, Charlene Van Buekenhout and more to be announced.

SWELL is a uniquely beautiful work that has transformed across a range of artistic media since its original inception in 2006. Changing with each group of collaborators, SWELL is an ongoing project that anticipates travelling to other cities so that it may continue to evolve over time.

Photo by Hunter Canning of the NY production featuring Katey Parker, Emma Galvin and Dan Vidor

For additional information about the history of SWELL, including notes about its past development in the United States, Australia and various locations throughout Scandinavia, please visit: http://www.swellshow.org/history.html.

Showtimes:
—–Friday, November 9: Doors at 7:30 p.m.; Showtime at 8:00 p.m.
—–Saturday, November 10: Doors at 7:30 p.m.; Showtime at 8:00 p.m.
—–Sunday, November 11: Doors at 1:30 p.m.; Showtime at 2:00 p.m.

Admission: Reserve seating will be made available beginning October 28. To reserve seats, please email info@atomiccentre.net or call 204.944.1621. Admission is $10.00 payable at the door (cash only). Thank you!

Location: Atomic (167 Logan Avenue – the only building at the corner of Martha Street and Logan Avenue). The venue is easily accessible by a number of bus routes. Limited street parking available; additional parking is available at the Impark lot adjacent to the Manitoba Museum of Man and Nature.

Additional links:

 

CFP: Whose Winnipeg? Neoliberalism, Settler Colonialism, and the Production of Urban Space

Call for papers: Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting
April 9th-13th, 2013, Los Angeles, California, USA.

Whose Winnipeg? Neoliberalism, Settler Colonialism, and the Production of Urban Space.


Organisers:

  • Owen Toews, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, CUNY Graduate Center
  • David Hugill, Department of Geography, York University
  • Bronwyn Dobchuk-Land, Department of Sociology, CUNY Graduate Center

Since the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba slipped from its position as one of the key centers of the Canadian political economy in the first half of the 20th century, it has often been stigmatized as a city in decline. Narratives of urban decay, infrastructural deterioration and capital out-migration have often defined perceptions of the city, obscuring the fact that it has experienced a relatively stable pattern of “slow-growth” (Leo 2006) for more than a generation. Perceptions of decline have, of course, been periodically interrupted by evidence of “revitalization” (the recent return of a National Hockey League franchise is a paradigmatic example) and a correlative spirit of new hope. It is our view, however, that this dialectic of destitution and salvation too often encourages us to think about Winnipeg in its specificity, obscuring the ways that urban dynamics there offer key opportunities to think through issues that are relevant in a range of North American spaces and places. It is, for example, one of the environments where the contemporary dynamics of settler colonial violence continue to be most viscerally articulated – from police violence, child welfare apprehensions, and racist redevelopment schemes, to a housing crisis, residential segregation, and extreme poverty. It is also a place where urban resistance to that violence has been most impressively coordinated, exemplified by, for example, a strong culture of neighbourhood-based organizing, a variegated history of responses from gang organizations, the movement to bring attention and resources to missing and murdered Aboriginal women, and one of the longest lasting Occupy/Decolonize encampments on the continent. Since the 1980s these processes have frequently been articulated through and against the neoliberalization of the city and province, as upward redistribution of resources and intensified punishment of the poor extends and deepens settler colonial processes of dispossession and subjection. This prompts us to ask: How does the production of twenty first century Winnipeg exemplify relationships and interconnections between settler colonialism and the neoliberalization of urban space?

We invite interventions from a wide variety of disciplines and contexts, both inside and outside the academy. The idea, ultimately, is to use the opportunity of this meeting to bring together a range of people interested in Winnipeg as a site of urban research from a broadly anti-colonial and anti-neoliberal perspective.

Please e-mail your abstract to either Owen (otoews @ gmail . com), David (dhugill @ yorku . ca), or Bronwyn (bdobchuk-land @ gc . cuny . edu) no later than October 20, 2012.

Forward widely!

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